Such hammer, much sickle.

China, China, China. China? Everybody in China!

China is BIG. That’s why we took a 3000km train ride, two bus rides that amounted to about 1310km and the distance covered by us cycling takes the bronze with approx. 1120km. The latter number includes about 40km uphill where somebody took us and our bikes in their car. Dainis and Laura will also insist that I cycled smaller distance because I used to go up hills by holding on to some lorries, I managed to grab onto while they were passing me. Let them do it, I’m not going for the gold here.

But while Dainis is trying to figure out what he has to say about Laos, I thought that I still have to share some happenings, revelations or just random stuff about China and us. Continue reading


Vagabond life at its finest in China

After reading my previous post everyone probably barely refrained themselves from messaging me: “Why? How? What happened? Dear God!!” Hold your horses, I’ll elaborate. On a quick note – if someone hasn’t done their homework and read the previous post, do it! Anyway, it came to a close with “we ended up sleeping on the street in the center of the city”.

It all began when we decided that we have enough of sitting in the train in China. But as Laos was still too far to get to with bicycles in the Chinese visa timeframe we had. That leads to the only logical choice here – we need to hitchhike! So we started to train holding our arms up for prolonged periods of time but on one of our training sessions, my arm hit a hard metallic object. Oh, that’s the bicycle! What are we going to do with them? A simple solution – we’ll send them via the China Railway Express freight shipping like the previous time, with the difference that we will not go by train ourselves. (If someone makes the decision to ship theirs stuff like this in China based on our successful experience, be warned – we have also heard of things getting lost on the way. Luckily for us, both of the times on the other end we received all that we had sent off.) Continue reading

At least it's under 30 degrees in night-time.

Not everywhere in China it is China

We entered China on a hot 14th June’s day. 你好! 4100km from home.

China’s apparently the country where people get an unsurpassable desire to burn their passports. There was a Latvian couple on a long term travel to China, and they got involved with doing that; and, as we all know, the infamous Pozharnik from Ukraine burned his passport and lived in China as an illegal immigrant for a while as well. Dainis and Laura made an agreement – if I burn my passport, they are not gonna help me and will carry on. Continue reading

20150609_1809-Asy Plateau & Co

Up and over the mountains – Kazakhstan

The Adventure

After having travelled for a while, we have sometimes started to wonder about what true adventures actually are. It seems that the word is being used far too often, and whenever I hear it now, it has an echo of a well-worn cliché and also I am to blame for it.

I suppose we have been quite safe and lucky in our journey and been sort of sheltered in a way, whether it’s because we have been playing safe or whether it’s because travelling is not actually as dangerous and adventurous in the times of GPS and modern technology as some may think, I do not know for certain (but I think it’s a bit of both). However, even after a good few months, if people ask me “what is our biggest adventure?” or “what has been the most adventurous time/event in our adventure?” I say “Kazakhstan!” and so does Dainis and Ivars and it has probably also been The One Adventure.

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East We Go – Kazakhstan

The Land of Kazakhs spreads wide

After all our big hopes of travelling through different countries of Central Asia were crushed, in the end we would have to do with one BIG country – Kazakhstan, which, after considering all the pros and cons would have been perfectly fine with us if it was not for one slight problem.

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